Spokane Mountaineers:
A CENTURY OF ADVENTURE

 

 

September 19, 1915

Miss Ora L. Maxwell and four other Spokane Public Library staffers founded the Spokane Walking Club. The club grew to 15 members, all female librarians.

1916: A controversial vote allows men to join the club.

1921: The club name is changed to the Spokane Mountaineers Club. Club membership numbers 58.

1925: The Spokane Mountaineers hike to Cheney and back—32 miles, and pay the expenses of five Campfire Girls to attend Camp Sweyolakan on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

1935: The club is incorporated and the name changed to Spokane Mountaineers, Inc. with "the tradition of developing an outdoor fellowship and responsibility for preserving wilderness values of the Inland Northwest”. A monthly bulletin called the Kinnikinnick (the club flower) is published for members.

1936: The Spokane Mountaineers names several peaks including Antoine, Shasta, Garry Palisades, Bonser Crater, Rocky Gorge and Barnicle Bill’s Rock.

1937: Climbing Class, the forerunner of today’s Mountain School, begins with a six session course. Bicycle events also join the club schedule.

1939: The Mountaineers purchase their own 40 acres on Mt. Spokane and build a 12 bed ski shack. Trails were cleared and a slalom slope added. In 1938, a cable tow was added.

1944: War rationing of gas affects summer outing at Priest Lake as well as other club outings.

1950: The Chalet replaced the little cabin on the Mountaineers’ property on Mt. Spokane

1956: A club team bagged 7,300 foot Glory Mountain, then the last unclimbed named peak in the Cascades.

1967: First ascent of the east face of Chimney Rock by Ed Cooper and Dave Hiser in two days.

1976: Priest Lake to Spokane bicycle ride. Later followed by a Bicycle Maintenance class.

1977: John Roskelly, Galen Rowell, Kim Schmitz and Dennis Henzel to climb Middle Trango Tower in Pakistan.

1980: A Spokane Mountaineers team including John Roskelley, Chris Kopczynski, Kim Momb and Dr. Jim States, were the first club team from one city to conquer a major Himalayan peak – fifth highest Makalu at 27,800 feet.

1987: SMI joins other regional clubs in Idaho Panhandle National Forest management plans to demand more protection for trails, roadless areas, water quality and wildlife habitat.

1996: Sponsorship of Centennial Trail Mile 17 began with donations and the first of many "clean up parties"

2001: SMI goes to Ecuador to climb.

2002: Intro to Backcountry and Basic Avalanche course offerred.

2007: Youth Rock School begins.

2009: Speak up for our remaining Wild Country is one of many conservation efforts of the club.

2013: A full roster of events and classes keeps members, old and new, fit and busy throughout the year. SMI membership: 530